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Fast Food Personas: Why Isn’t Myers Briggs a Core of Social Media Profiles?

Posted on Jan 4, 2013 by in ThiNK First | 7 comments

Myers-Briggs-Facebook---Social-Media

Aren’t we meant to be getting more human in social media?

It’s all about better, deeper social interactions, right?

Aren’t the tools meant to be helping us augment our reality?

We live in a very infosnacky world. No time to read. We just want headlines and takeaways. We’d rather skim and infographic or a list, if you haven’t read The Shallows by Nicholas Carr, I’d highly recommend it. We are all skimmers and channel flippers.

We like our information like fast food and ready meals. We want value for little or no effort.

It struck my that like of Myers Briggs profiles are perfect information snacks.

The graphic comes from a post on All Things D and shows that 65% of people tested has a Facebook profile. I wonder what percentage on people on Facebook have taken a personality profile? I suspect it’s much lower. What’s your guess?

I’ve met some strange people via social media an in life. I’ve experienced some odd social exchanges. My lips are sealed. Trust me, we’re all a little weird. Joking aside, isn’t it easier to communicate and connect with people when you know someone’s personality type such as their Myers Briggs profile?

One of my biggest revelations in social media is how many thought leaders in the field are introverts.

That’s cool – I’m a borderline extrovert, depending on the topic and day of the week.

I’m an ENFP

Extravert(56%) iNtuitive(25%) Feeling (50%) Perceiving(22%)

  • You have moderate preference of Extraversion over Introversion (56%)
  • You have moderate preference of Intuition over Sensing (25%)
  • You have moderate preference of Feeling over Thinking (50%)
  • You have slight preference of Perceiving over Judging (22%)

I’m a late adopter of Myers Briggs. So it’s new and shiny for me, so forgive me if I’m missing something. I’ve always hated this kind of stuff, but I’m warming too it finally. We’re all late adopters of something.

I’ve always shared external thoughts, but internal ones not so much. I  shared my profile for the first time in this post, just a week ago.

When I think about it, I’ve been a Myers Briggs lurker. I’ve consumed, but not contributed.

Have we become comfortable enough to share this information? Social Networks keep shifting our boundaries and our comfort zones. How do you feel about sharing your profile?

Why aren’t the social tools making it easier for us to engage and converse appropriately?

We could all use all the people skills help we can get, and it strikes me that Myers Briggs helps you figure out the right way to engage with an individual.

It feels more valuable than tracking influence a la Kred, Klout, PeerIndex, TweetLevel, etc.

Tools are quick to suggesting who to connect with, but not how.

Why is there no central app to let us integrate and share our MB profiles? Perhaps it’s too soon, but is now the time?

Have we become more share willing? I sense so. Zuck is pushing us. Every successful  new network pushes on a new dimension.

We keep hearing that social media is about being human, and authentic and vulnerable. Aren’t we meant to be thinking and acting more human? What if this isn’t in your inherent nature?

Couldn’t MB help you understand what kind of human interaction another person needs?

What’s your MB profile. Tag yourself by liking the item that matches your profile

What's your myers briggs classification
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Nick Kellet What's your myers briggs classification

Listly by Nick Kellet

Like it if it's you, Add your classification if it's missing

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  1. 1  The Inspirer - Portrait of an ENFP

    The Inspirer - Portrait of an ENFP

    As an ENFP, your primary mode of living is focused externally, where you take things in primarily via your intuition. Your secondary mode is internal, where you deal with things according to how you feel about them, or how they fit in with your personal value system.

  2. 2  The Idealist | Portrait of an INFP

    The Idealist | Portrait of an INFP

    As an INFP, your primary mode of living is focused internally, where you deal with things according to how you feel about them, or how they fit into your personal value system. Your secondary mode is external, where you take things in primarily via your intuition.

  3. 3  The Scientist | Portrait of an INTJ

    The Scientist | Portrait of an INTJ

    As an INTJ, your primary mode of living is focused internally, where you take things in primarily via your intuition. Your secondary mode is external, where you deal with things rationally and logically.

  4. 4  The Giver | Portrait of an ENFJ

    The Giver | Portrait of an ENFJ

    As an ENFJ, you're primary mode of living is focused externally, where you deal with things according to how you feel about them, or how they fit into your personal value system. Your secondary mode is internal, where you take things in primarily via your intuition.

  5. 5  The Executive | Portrait of an ENTJ

    The Executive | Portrait of an ENTJ

    As an ENTJ, your primary mode of living is focused externally, where you deal with things rationally and logically. Your secondary mode is internal, where you take things in primarily via your intuition.

  6. 6  The Visionary | Portrait of an ENTP

    The Visionary | Portrait of an ENTP

    As an ENTP, your primary mode of living is focused externally, where you take things in primarily via your intuition. Your secondary mode is internal, where you deal with things rationally and logically.

  7. 7  The Caregiver | Portrait of an ESFJ

    The Caregiver | Portrait of an ESFJ

    As an ESFJ, your primary mode of living is focused externally, where you deal with things according to how you feel about them, or how they fit in with your personal value system. Your secondary mode is internal, where you take things in via your five senses in a literal, concrete fashion.

  8. 8  The Performer | Portrait of an ESFP

    The Performer | Portrait of an ESFP

    As an ESFP, your primary mode of living is focused externally, where you take things in via your five senses in a literal, concrete fashion. Your secondary mode is internal, where you deal with things according to how you feel about them, or how they fit with your personal value system.

  9. 9  The Guardian | Portrait of an ESTJ

    The Guardian | Portrait of an ESTJ

    As an ESTJ, your primary mode of living is focused externally, where you deal with things rationally and logically. Your secondary mode is internal, where you take things in via your five senses in a literal, concrete fashion.

  10. 10  The Doer | Portrait of an ESTP

    The Doer | Portrait of an ESTP

    As an ESTP, your primary mode of living is focused externally, where you take things in via your five senses in a literal, concrete fashion. Your secondary mode is internal, where you deal with things rationally and logically.

  11. 11  The Protector | Portrait of an INFJ

    The Protector | Portrait of an INFJ

    As an INFJ, your primary mode of living is focused internally, where you take things in primarily via intuition. Your secondary mode is external, where you deal with things according to how you feel about them, or how they fit with your personal value system.

  12. 12  The Thinker | Portrait of an INTP

    The Thinker | Portrait of an INTP

    As an INTP, your primary mode of living is focused internally, where you deal with things rationally and logically. Your secondary mode is external, where you take things in primarily via your intuition.

  13. 13  The Nurturer | Portrait of an ISFJ

    The Nurturer | Portrait of an ISFJ

    As an ISFJ, your primary mode of living is focused internally, where you takes things in via your five senses in a literal, concrete fashion. Your secondary mode is external, where you deal with things according to how you feel about them, or how they fit into your personal value system.

  14. 14  The Artist | Portrait of an ISFP

    The Artist | Portrait of an ISFP

    As an ISFP, your primary mode of living is focused internally, where you deal with things according to how you feel about them, or how they fit into your value system. Your secondary mode is external, where you take things in via your five sense in a literal, concrete fashion.

  15. 15  The Duty Fulfiller | Portrait of an ISTJ

    The Duty Fulfiller | Portrait of an ISTJ

    As an ISTJ, your primary mode of living is focused internally, where you take things in via your five senses in a literal, concrete fashion. Your secondary mode is external, where you deal with things rationally and logically.

  16. 16  The Mechanic | Portrait of an ISTP

    The Mechanic | Portrait of an ISTP

    As an ISTP, your primary mode of living is focused internally, where you deal with things rationally and logically. Your secondary mode is external, where you take things in via your five senses in a literal, concrete fashion.

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I got close to this idea in a previous post on connectors, but when this idea popped into my head, I somehow couldn’t shake it. Isn’t this frictionless sharing?

Don’t know your profile? Take a test. Here’s a list of sites that offer Myers Briggs tests. Many are free.

Why isn’t this baked into an email client that would tell me and help me how to engage and communicate to given individuals?

Wouldn’t you be willingly trade your profile in return for getting better communication that meets your needs?

It seems less trivial that a lot of the stuff we do share.

Am I missing something?

Does this idea make your skin crawl?

Myers Briggs has its detractors including Malcolm Gladwell. Here’s a more complete list of the flaws of personality tests.

For a while Klout segmented your engagement into 1 of 16 buckets, but that got dropped in favor or a news style feed. For all it’s flaws I quite liked it. Perhaps that just me. I’m a sucker for a good segmentation model.

All this analysis and segmentation of people is a fast moving space. I’m sure we will see more activity in the next 12-18 months.

I’m sure there will be some acquisitions. Your thoughts?

Image Credit  AllThingsd.com

 

Nick Kellet (148 Posts)

Nick is co-founder the social curation platform Listly, that combines crowdsourcing, content curation and embedable lists to drive high-level community engagement, live inside your blog posts. Connect with Nick on Twitter · Linkedin, Facebook and G+ and follow his writing via his other guest posts and on his blogs at NickKellet.com and blog.list.ly


7 comments
InfoSara
InfoSara like.author.displayName 1 Like

It's interesting I've said it many many times (just never blog about it but finally comment) that "We are in fast-food consumerism scale-oriented society that everyone is hungry for attention" (full comment here http://www.huffingtonpost.com/social/SaraChi/linkedin-trustcloud-klout_b_2398201_218754592.html), I don't think MBTI has much to do with our social media profile, it may pave the imagine and sometimes that might have opposite effects. INTJ can be very selective :)

nickkellet
nickkellet moderator like.author.displayName 1 Like

@InfoSara I like your hungry for attention notion. I think that's powerful.  I'm torn on the value - I think there are ways to help people appreciate each other. How quick can we find common ground? How do we find a connection? I think there's something in profiling that can do that.

I learned about http://www.wdprofiletest.com/ Wealth Dynamics from @Michael Q Todd  which is a similar concept

I've also been exchanging some emails about other such systems. 

I only posed the question, it seems there's some action and curiosity in this space.

Fun times. The McKinsetite in you is looking for MECE models, I just know it;) 

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mqtodd
mqtodd

@nickkellet I have done a huge amount of training about Wealth Dynamics. I can quickly pick which of 8 entrepeneurial profiles someone is 

nickkellet
nickkellet moderator

@mqtodd Speaking as a board game publisher, I thought it totally sounded like the basis for an awesome game. I love my Indie style board games. Kind of reminded me of Bruno Faidutti's game Citadels.


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cendrinemedia
cendrinemedia like.author.displayName 1 Like

I took the Myers Brigs test a long time ago, and can't remember my classification! I'm going to take it again after I am done commenting.

Your article raises a very important question: the role of compassion. I think there is total lack of it in this day and age. 

We need to be more open minded about the way we "do" social media.

nickkellet
nickkellet moderator

@cendrinemedia Compassion is a good word. I've had some interesting off line responses to this post. It's funny how little the tools help us be human. We only just getting past the connecting stage. Lots more to come I think 

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cendrinemedia
cendrinemedia

@nickkellet The tools can only help us be more human if we learn to use them accordingly. 

One thing that I find fascinating is that the more technology we have, the less we actually communicate with one another. 

By the way, I am an INTJ. :-)